DEWS

Harmony

Guest Article by Merla Thomson

For over 40 years Merla Thomson has personally raised, trained, and shown some of Canada’s top dogs, and for the last ten years, has published Canine Review, Canada’s oldest independent dog magazine. Merla is currently licensed to judge a few breeds and is a huge proponent of socializing dogs to be good citizens in the community.


Harmony

When I first saw the DEWS program, I immediately felt it was an excellent way to make our walkways, and parks more harmonious, even for those who do not have dogs. It’s easy for towns and cities to implement and even easier for folks to abide by.

Everyone knows that the basic phrase “stop, wait and go” is often used in association with the traffic lights. Even my 8 year old grandson knew, without my telling him, what the colours stood for. I asked him what he thought these bandanas would mean if he saw them on a dog. He immediately interpreted the meaning of the red bandana as “STOP!” and added, ”Means maybe I shouldn’t go near that dog”. He uncertainly ventured “WAIT” for yellow, and said green meant “GO! Because the dog is ok to go to”. Continue reading

Dog Aggression, A Simple Learned Behavior?

jc-photo-with-dog

Guest Article by “J-C” St-Louis – Canine Behaviourist

“J-C” is a former Calgary Police K-9 Handler and Breeding Coordinator. He is full time consultant with over 30 years experience who does assessments and private one-on-one, in-home training, and he also receives referrals by veterinarians. “J-C” has offered his ongoing active support in the promotion of the DEWS safety system and has graciously attended with us to lend his support of DEWS at a recent trade show.


Dog Aggression, A Simple Learned Behavior?

A very common misconception in the dog world is that the problem of aggression primarily occurs as a direct result of learned behaviours, which are sometimes exacerbated by the inability or neglect of owners to properly prevent them from occurring in the first place. This idea has been floating around for quite a while and seems to have experienced a resurgence over the last few years, partially because of the advent of popular, folklorish, pseudo-scientifically based dog training TV shows, but also mainly because of the lack of general knowledge and understanding from the average dog owner all the way up to the “so- called” experts. The issue definitely demands our attention and there certainly seems to be evidence to show that, indeed very often the above claims are accurate, but this is a huge oversimplification. Continue reading